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Covid Delta Variant: Virus is changing and we need to change too!

The entire world is changing its overall strategy on the coronavirus pandemic this week. Masks are back, vaccine mandates are looming, and officials have sounded more worried than they have in months.

Delta Variant: Virus is changing and we need to change too!

The entire world is changing its overall strategy on the coronavirus pandemic this week. Masks are back, vaccine mandates are looming, and officials have sounded more worried than they have in months. Employees must wear a mask throughout the day at work while also keeping distance from others and submitting to a virus test once per week for safety reasons driving these changes as two factors: The large number who remain unvaccinated due to fears about vaccines' health effects combined with Delta variant's rapid spread across Europe over recent weeks which forces authorities around the world into immediate action against disease threat."

The Delta variant, originally known as B.1-617.2 has been around since last year but in recent months it's become the fastest spreading virus of all time according to many experts and scientists who are researching this issue more now than ever before. The US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have also said that COVID-19 cases have increased over 300% nationally from June 19th to July 23rd along with parallel increases in hospitalizations and deaths are driven by the highly transmissible B: 1 617 2 delta variant which is one of a few reasons why they're so concerned about this new strain because there doesn't seem like any way we can stop or cure it yet if at all.

 

The Delta variant, originally known as B.1.617.2, has been around since last year but in recent months it's become speedily dominant with an 80% share of newly diagnosed cases across the US according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC says there have also been "parallel increases" in hospitalizations and deaths which are being driven by this new highly transmissible strain - COVID-19 or what is now better described as the Delta infection

Let's understand what the Delta variant is: a virus that has been around since late last year but in recent months it has become speedily dominant in many countries. It accounts for more than 80% of newly diagnosed cases.

The Delta variant is more transmissible in some studies, but not all. One CDC document indicates the Delta variant to be as contagious as chickenpox with each infected person infecting a few others. This difficult number to check because it requires much testing which has yet been done

The Delta variant is more transmissible than traditional coronavirus, but we don't know by how much. The CDC estimates that the new virus might be about 60-200% as contagious as chickenpox with each infected person infecting eight or nine others on average while a typical case of common cold only has an infection rate of two other people per affected individual. One paragraph from one CDC document indicates that this number could even be higher and since it's difficult to determine exact statistics without comprehensive testing, there are multiple possible outcomes for these estimations.

 

In a recent presentation, the CDC has noted that vaccines prevent more than 90% of severe diseases but may be less effective at preventing infection or transmission. However, if you're vaccinated with one of two currently approved COVID-19 mRNA vaccine brands (Pfizer and Moderna), then evidence suggests they are highly effective against hospitalization and death for various strains such as Alpha (B.1.1.7) Beta (B 1/351), Gamma( P 1 ), Delta( B/617).

 The presentation notes that vaccines are less effective at preventing infection or transmission and sometimes can lead to breakthrough outbreaks in communities despite vaccination. To help combat these effects, the site also noted Moderna's mRNA COVID-19 vaccine is highly effective for many strains of measles including Alpha (B.1.1), Beta (B2) Gamma (P), Delta B(2).

A recent study has shown that the effectiveness of vaccines against certain variants may be lower than previously anticipated. The CDC is urging for ongoing monitoring to ensure appropriate vaccination strategies are developed and implemented with these new findings in mind.

Data suggest that the vaccine is less effective against confirmed infection and symptomatic disease caused by variants of influenza. Ongoing monitoring should be done to ensure that vaccines are still as effective in fighting off Delta variant though lab tests indicate immune response generated should cover it.

Delta has a unique set of mutations that may allow it to evade the human immune system and be more efficient in infecting cells. Delta's changes are limited to its receptor-binding domain, which allows for tight connections with the host cell while also helping this virus escape detection by hiding from our body's natural defenses like antibodies. One change is believed to help make these bonds tighter--making us sicker faster!

The delta virus has at least three mutations on a structure that is called the receptor-binding domain--the part of the disease-causing agent responsible for docking into human cells it infects. It may help evade detection by our immune system, and one mutation, in particular, could make it bind more tightly to infected cells.

 

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