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Viruses can damage your liver


These are very important questions but the most public are not aware of the answers. You must know what is viral hepatitis

Have you had jaundice anytime in your life? Do you know what was the cause? Are you sure you do not have any virus lurking inside you?

These are very important questions but the most public are not aware of the answers. You must know what is viral hepatitis

Hepatitis” means inflammation of the liver and also refers to a group of viral infections that affect the liver. The most common types are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C, Hepatitis E

Viral hepatitis is the leading cause of liver cancer and the most common reason for liver transplantation worldwide.

Hepatitis B is a silent global epidemic that has infected 370 million people and is responsible for almost 1 million deaths annually.

Some people who have hepatitis have no symptoms. Others may have

  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Dark-colored urine and pale bowel movements
  • Stomach pain
  • Jaundice, yellowing of skin and eyes

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is an acute liver disease caused by the Hepatitis A virus (HAV), lasting from a few weeks to several months. It does not lead to chronic infection. Infections are in many cases mild, with most people making a full recovery and remaining immune from further HAV infections. However, HAV infections can also be severe and life-threatening. Most people in areas of the world with poor sanitation have been infected with this virus. Safe and effective vaccines are available to prevent HAV

Transmission: Ingestion of fecal matter, even in microscopic amounts, from close person-to-person contact or ingestion of contaminated food or drinks.

Vaccination: Hepatitis A vaccination is recommended for all children starting at age 1 year, travelers to certain countries, and others at risk.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV). It ranges in severity from a mild illness, lasting a few weeks (acute), to a serious long-term (chronic) illness that can lead to liver disease or liver cancer.

Transmission: Common modes of transmission for this virus include receipt of contaminated blood or blood products, invasive medical procedures using contaminated equipment and for hepatitis B transmission from mother to baby at birth, from family member to child, and also by sexual contact.

Vaccination: Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for all infants, older children and adolescents who were not vaccinated previously, and adults at risk for HBV infection.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused by the Hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV infection sometimes results in an acute illness, but most often becomes a chronic condition that can lead to cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer.

Transmission: Contact with the blood of an infected person, primarily through sharing contaminated needles to inject drugs. Sexual transmission is also possible, but is much less common.

Vaccination: There is no vaccine for Hepatitis C.

Hepatitis D

Hepatitis D is a serious liver disease caused by the Hepatitis D virus (HDV) and relies on HBV to replicate. It is uncommon in the United States.

Transmission: Contact with infectious blood, similar to how HBV is spread.

Vaccination: Safe and effective hepatitis B vaccines provide protection from HDV infection.

Hepatitis E

Hepatitis E is a serious liver disease caused by the Hepatitis E virus (HEV) that usually results in an acute infection. It does not lead to a chronic infection. While rare in the United States, Hepatitis E is common in many parts of the world.

Transmission: Ingestion of fecal matter, even in microscopic amounts; outbreaks are usually associated with contaminated water supply in countries with poor sanitation.

Vaccination: There is currently no FDA-approved vaccine for Hepatitis E.

Dr. Rakesh Rai

MBBS, MS — General Surgery, FRCS — General Surgery (Upper GI)Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic,25 Years Experience Overall (23 years as specialist)